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  • Gone South

    I’m back from Georgia and the Garden of Good and Evil. Once again it was a terrific visit, and if the Sequential Art program of the Savannah College of Art and Design ever asks you to come speak at their Artists’ Forum, the answer is Yes. It was more fried food than I’ve eaten in a long time, and certainly more sweet tea.

    Bernard Chang and I were the ones coming from the West Coast, and thus wiped out from having to catch 6 am flights. Plus Bernard was coming down with a cold, so it wasn’t a great weekend for him to go to several activities and lecture; nonetheless he kicked butt on all his duties and advice giving. I also got to hang out a lot with Sanford Greene and Jill Thompson. Our hotel had a great breakfast buffet and we all made full use of it. Talking storytelling over breakfast also helped us get in the right frame of mind for our workshops. For some reason I only saw Chris Brunner at night. Could he be… WAMPYR? This was also my first time meeting Clement Suave, Kaz Strzepek (who has has a show hanging at the Floating World Comics Shop’s gallery now, for you Portlanders) and former SCADuate Heidi Arnhold who is drawing for TokyoPop on the Henson Dark Crystal books right now. And sometimes-teacher Mark Schultz was back to learn ‘em all on how to wish they could ink like he does. Here’s a complete list of the visiting artists from the SCAD website, as I am too lazy to link individually.

    One of the best features is that many of the students volunteer to keep us from getting lost and to do such things as cart us around to see sights. Joe Pimienta was especially helpful with keeping track of the students lined up for me to do portfolio reviews, and guiding me over to the Panel Discussion at the end of the event when I over-napped. Jeremy Mullins also went to heroic efforts with keeping us on task and coordinating the projections during the panel. The only weirdness there was that the Student Center insists on having this active changing light display that was making everyone loopy as the room changed from green to red constantly. After that, Andre Frattino transformed into his other storytelling mode as a town Ghost Guide, and gave us a terrific tour of Haunted Savannah. Jill Thompson really got into that, not surprising as she’s the Scary Godmother creator. So we were all head-full of ghost pirates and undead giant man-children after that, simply much cooler than most speaking engagements. Even (well, especially) teachers pitch in on all the driving and coordinating, and thanks to Atlanta-branch teacher Shawn Crystal, I was able to go switch things up at a Greek restaurant before all the heavy food took me down completely. The end of the whole trip was talking music with teacher Bob Pendarvis, who like myself also places trust in longtime LA-oddball dj Rodney Bingenheimer.

    As promised, I’m going to make my notes to the students more cohesive and a version of them up here this week. I should be starting tomorrow, so check back in. Y’all.

    Comments

    Comment from Zack Smith
    Time: November 12, 2007, 3:40 pm

    I am mad for SCAD — I’ve run into a half-dozen artists from there at cons this past year, and every last one is incredible. I’m really excited to see what this new crop of artists brings to comics.

    Hedi Arnhold is damn good — I saw her doodling at SDCC, and had her whip me up a Garthem. Roll that beautiful bean footage!

    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m92/ZackSmith8/Garthem.jpg

    Comment from Chris Schweizer
    Time: November 13, 2007, 6:41 am

    I got a lot out of the workshop this weekend, so thanks! Can’t wait to see Periscope.

    Comment from Parker
    Time: November 13, 2007, 7:40 am

    Make sure to bring your sketchbook, Chris!

    Comment from jack marlowe
    Time: November 13, 2007, 12:40 pm

    Its good see the strong conception of comic art and the artists than make possible and teach the next generations.